The question is, how can the public, particularly those who are in shared community with survivors of violence, disrupt this “sanity” in order to receive a more spacious and messier account of survivorhood that incorporates survivors’ complex and multifaceted truths? We must learn how to develop community-based responses that are dynamic and flexible enough to adapt to the charged politics of survivors’ choices, without forcibly molding them to fit simplistic narratives that are more politically convenient or emotionally reassuring for others. This is not a suggestion to uncritically idealize survivor testimonies or to fail to consider other people’s narratives and accounts about abusive relationships. I am proposing, however, a critical mindfulness about the treatment of survivor testimonies and the pressure put on them to satisfy expectations that others may not even know they are harboring. It requires an openness to complexity and contradiction, something that is not easy to sustain in the context of crisis-based responses that domestic violence can trigger. However, a practice of reflexiveness and a commitment to the recognition of the subjectivity of survivors can help map pathways to getting there.

Rihanna, Accountability, & Survivor Subjectivity

In solidarity with survivors of domestic violence who are shamed, ridiculed, intimidated, and condescended to by people in their families, communities, and the general public.  In solidarity with Janay Rice who, on top of everything, has to now endure the world’s judgment of her and her choices. Ain’t Janay a subject?  #BlackLivesMatter 

A decade ago, I sat talking to a young mother on welfare about her experiences with technology. When our conversation turned to Electronic Benefit Transfer cards (EBT), Dorothy* said, “They’re great. Except [Social Services] uses them as a tracking device.” I must have looked shocked, because she explained that her caseworker routinely looked at her EBT purchase records. Poor women are the test subjects for surveillance technology, Dorothy told me ruefully, and you should pay attention to what happens to us. You’re next.

My family talks about food the way other people talk about the weather. Or art. Status updates, unsentimental critiques, lesson plans. A cornerstone of jokes about frustrated desire, lines drawn in the sand, and competitive one upsmanship. A living thread that adapts in a conversation both simple and complex. The truest answer to “how are you?”

i12bent:

Mark Rothko, abstract expressionist, the Russian-American angel of the color field: Sep. 25, 1903 - 1970…
Above: Violet, Black, Orange, Yellow on White and Red, 1949

i12bent:

Mark Rothko, abstract expressionist, the Russian-American angel of the color field: Sep. 25, 1903 - 1970…

Above: Violet, Black, Orange, Yellow on White and Red, 1949

The Ballad Of Dorothy Parker by Prince from the album: Sign 'O' the Times

beatscomicsandlife:

Prince - The Ballad Of Dorothy Parker

guerrillamamamedicine:

holaafrica:

tamburina:

Adolph Gottlieb, Blues, 1962
In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).

(via i12bent)

guerrillamamamedicine:

holaafrica:

tamburina:

Adolph Gottlieb, Blues, 1962

In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).

(via i12bent)

“Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation # 474” (1954)Aaron Siskind

“Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation # 474” (1954)
Aaron Siskind

Is it possible to be astonished and at the same time not surprised?

President Josiah Bartlett, The West Wing

A general summary of my reaction when reading the news.