A decade ago, I sat talking to a young mother on welfare about her experiences with technology. When our conversation turned to Electronic Benefit Transfer cards (EBT), Dorothy* said, “They’re great. Except [Social Services] uses them as a tracking device.” I must have looked shocked, because she explained that her caseworker routinely looked at her EBT purchase records. Poor women are the test subjects for surveillance technology, Dorothy told me ruefully, and you should pay attention to what happens to us. You’re next.

My family talks about food the way other people talk about the weather. Or art. Status updates, unsentimental critiques, lesson plans. A cornerstone of jokes about frustrated desire, lines drawn in the sand, and competitive one upsmanship. A living thread that adapts in a conversation both simple and complex. The truest answer to “how are you?”

i12bent:

Mark Rothko, abstract expressionist, the Russian-American angel of the color field: Sep. 25, 1903 - 1970…
Above: Violet, Black, Orange, Yellow on White and Red, 1949

i12bent:

Mark Rothko, abstract expressionist, the Russian-American angel of the color field: Sep. 25, 1903 - 1970…

Above: Violet, Black, Orange, Yellow on White and Red, 1949

The Ballad Of Dorothy Parker by Prince from the album: Sign 'O' the Times

beatscomicsandlife:

Prince - The Ballad Of Dorothy Parker

guerrillamamamedicine:

holaafrica:

tamburina:

Adolph Gottlieb, Blues, 1962
In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).

(via i12bent)

guerrillamamamedicine:

holaafrica:

tamburina:

Adolph Gottlieb, Blues, 1962

In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).

(via i12bent)

“Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation # 474” (1954)Aaron Siskind

“Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation # 474” (1954)
Aaron Siskind

Is it possible to be astonished and at the same time not surprised?

President Josiah Bartlett, The West Wing

A general summary of my reaction when reading the news.

I begin by exploring the deluge of requirements that follow a woman’s receipt of government subsidization of her prenatal health care costs.  That is, as a condition of receipt of Medicaid coverage of prenatal care expenses, poor, uninsured pregnant women are compelled to meet with a battery of professionals— namely nurses, nutritionists, social workers, health educators, and financial officers— who inquire into areas of women’s lives that frequently exceed the purview of their medical care. This chapter argues that, as a result, Medicaid mandates an intrusion into women’s private lives and produces pregnancy as an opportunity for state supervision, management, and regulation of poor, uninsured women. In essence, the receipt of Medicaid inaugurates poor women into the state regulatory apparatus.

Khiara M. Bridges, Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization (excerpt here)

We need an intersectional analysis, a race/gender/class/disability dimension of analysis, of surveillance culture.  The dominant discourse around surveillance, privacy rights, and civil liberties marginalizes or discredits the reality of state regulation and violation of human lives, as described above.  It’s not that I don’t care that the government has access to voicemail records, it’s that I don’t think we can understand why or how that is happening without taking seriously the relationship between state surveillance and the criminalization of reproduction or state-based sexual assault, among other items.